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Concert

Wed
05
Feb 20

Jakub Hrůša conducts Beethoven, Elgar and Dvořák

Nürnberg, Meistersingerhalle
20:00 Uhr

“Everything good & nice & clean & fresh & sweet is far away – never to return.” Elgar wrote these words in his autumn years, which were overshadowed by care, illness, fear and the death of people close to him. The passing of his beloved wife Alice hit him particularly hard, and Elgar was also horrified by the events of the First World War. Despite his fame and glory, the composer – who had always been oversensitive – withdrew more and more. He became filled with an overwhelming nostalgia, which is evident particularly in his last great work, the famous, melancholy cello concerto of 1917, written when Elgar was 62. Its calm themes reappear again and again, like memories of days long past. When asked what its sad tone represented, Elgar gave the simple reply: “a man’s attitude to life”. It is a wistful, confessional work, a sad swansong for an epoch – and a very personal, emotionally charged concerto full of the spirit of farewell. There is hardly a better candidate to interpret this piece than the outstanding cellist Sol Gabetta. After this melancholy journey of the soul, our principal conductor will take us through Dvořák’s equally moving seventh symphony. Dvořák had to contend with prejudice for a long time: as the composer of works such as the “Slavonic Dances”, he was often perceived as a cliché “Bohemian musician”, unable to play anything but dance music. Because of this, it was his greatest wish that his 1885 symphony “must move the world”. And as if to say “I can be different!”, the panorama he paints in this masterly orchestral work is largely dark and passionate.

Jakub Hrůša Conductor
Sol Gabetta Violoncello

Ludwig van Beethoven Ouvertüre zur Schauspielmusik »Egmont« op. 84
Edward Elgar Konzert für Violoncello und Orchester e-Moll op. 85
Antonín Dvořák Symphonie Nr. 7 d-Moll op. 70

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